Serino Cigars Review

i Cigars

Cigar Reviews - News - Babes - Deals - Cubans - Ratings

Cigar Reviews
Serino Cigars
Serino Cigars
Serino Cigars Review
Serino Cigars Review
Serino Cigars Review
i Cigars
Arrow
Arrow
Slider

Serino Cigars Review

By Staff of i Cigars

Serino Royal Maduro Toro

Rare 90 Rating

(Highest Rating for any Cigar made outside of Cuba)

The Serino line of Premium Hand Rolled Cigars are a Premium Nicaraguan Product.

Don’t let that deter you from trying these amazing cigars.

Owner Tony Serino has a long history in the Cigar Industry running a large Cigar Importing Company, and he did his homework on these beauties before he put his name on them.

To create his cigars, Serino has teamed up with Omar González Alemán of La Corona Cigars S.A..

González is the former head director of the La Corona Factory in Havana, maker of many well known Cuban brands such as Romeo y Julieta, Hoyo de Monterrey, Cuaba, Por Larrañaga, Saint Luis Rey, San Cristobal de Habana and some Montecristos.

To cigar enthusiast, González is best known for his involvement of brands HR, Soneros, and Cubanacan.

We smoked a Royal Maduro Toro for this review, and we were very impressed with the complete package this super smooth smoke gave us.

If you enjoy a heavy Maduro smoke, this is not for you. The Maduro XX line of Serino is the heavier Maduro line.

However, if you want to taste the smoothest Maduro we ever encountered in over 40 years of smoking fine cigars, you will want to try this amazing smoke.

The Ecuadorian Maduro wrapper is smooth as silk and well oiled.

The Label is a gorgeous Blue and Gold.

The construction is solid, showing only a true craftsman or craftswoman was involved in the process of rolling this amazing smoke.

The draw was perfect and the smoke, well it was a Maduro, but it was as smooth of a smoke you will ever find, leading us to wonder how much smoother the natural line of the Serino Cigar Line named the Royal Connecticut might be (Review on that Cigar is coming). The burn was even and the ash held up for around two inches and when it broke off a perfect red hot cone appeared. (See pics below).

While many reviewers are saying they grasp hints of chocolate and cinnamon in pre-light draw and early on in this smooth smoke, I rarely detect such tastes from any cigars not from Cuba and only the Cuban Montecristo #2 allows my palate to taste both chocolate and cinnamon every time I smoke one of those beauties.

Beware of any review where the reviewer is dumb enough to say they detected CEDAR, the reason is CEDAR is routinely used to protect cigars from insects. Humidors and even Cigar Boxes are lined with CEDAR since insects hate the smell of Cedar just like they hate the smell of Cinnamon and Garlic.

I have honestly never tasted any such flavor such as cinnamon outside of Cuban Cigars for a very good reason, the soil in Cuba produces those flavors so all Dominican, Nicaraguan and Honduran Cigars have their own flavors. While the Cocoa Plant has been in the Islands for thousands of years, the use of a Cinnamon like spice native to Cuba that even Columbus thought was Cinnamon, was most likely a natural pesticide used by Cuban farmers since insects hate Cinnamon odors.

It may also be that there was an introduction of Cinnamon as a PESTICIDE hundreds of years ago IN CUBA. So either it is the native plant that confused Columbus to think Cinnamon was growing in the new worold or it may have been used by plantations post Columbus since the use of Cinnamon as a natural pesticide is very ancient knowledge. So either a natural cinnamon type plant native to Cuba or actual use of Cinnamon as a pesticide post Columbus, is why the soil has such flavors. Tobacco was recently introduced into areas outside of Cuba (post 1960) so new pesticides filled with POISONS have been used to contain tobacco insects, such flavors in the Cuban SOIL cannot pass into Cuban SEEDS, just like the vine shoots of the top grapes from the Bordeaux Region of France did not bring with them the high alkaline soil of the Bordeaux region of France, so that is why California varietals taste like California and the top French Bordeaux’s taste like French Bordeaux’s.

Both Cocoa and Tobacco were native to the New World, but the soil is different in every region growing Tobacco today. Cinnamon has been used for ages for many things, but it is not native to the New World regions, since it came as a spice over the Millennias from Africa and Asia, and it has been traded since Biblical Times in the Middle East and later Europe. So the Colonization of the new world most likely brought real Cinnamon to the Americas as a rare pesticide and the some of the best Cuban Cigar Plantations were laced with it.

There is just NO WAY for the soil in the Dominican, Nicaragua nor Honduras to have ever been peppered with real Cinnamon to control insects before modern pesticides were used in those areas. The centuries old use of Cinnamon as a pesticide IN CUBA is what makes Cuban Cigars totally unique. However, it may be the native plant that confused Columbus as cinnamon is what is native to the Cuban soil compared to actual cinnamon.

Since Cocoa was native to the Americas, that flavor may very well be in cigars outside of Cuba, but I cannot find it outside of Cuban cigars that I smoke, so maybe my palate isn’t as sensitive as others (40+ years of smoking cigars might have dulled my own palate).

While the aroma of flavor comes alive for me when smoking a real Montecristo #2 from Cuba, the same cigar from the D.R. has no such flavors and smoothness of a Dominican Montecristo #2 is similar to this Serino cigar, only the Serino is SMOOTHER than a DR Monte #2, which is a great cigar.

So while I will be the first to admit a snob appeal of my own to Cuban cigars due to the fact my palate doesn’t detect all the cinnamon and chocolates in cigars from outside Cuba that most ‘reviewers’ write about, this Nicaraguan product is excellent and as far as cigars from outside Cuba goes, so I admit I have a bias to Dominican Cigars since the top Cuban houses I enjoy mostly went to the DR post Castro.

Years ago a cigar from Nicaragua or the Honduras couldn’t be sold to most cigar shops I’ve been going to now for over 40 years, but today some of the ‘best cigars’ as a new generation of cigar smokers are ranking them, means many Nicaraguan products are now considered ‘great’.

I rarely say any cigar outside of Cuba is ‘great’ and to me DR products such Opus X and other premium DR products have only made me appreciate them as smooth smokes and none pack the rich chocolate and cinnamon flavors of a real Cuban Cigar.

Now if some cigar houses are starting to lace their products with essential oils perhaps to put into newer cigars what nature puts into a real Cuban, perhaps that is what some ‘reviewers’ are tasting on their palates.

Overall, considering this cigar is not Cuban, and those (a few Cubans) are the only cigars I have ever given a 95+ rating to, I am perplexed as to what should be the rating for what can only be described as a GREAT CIGAR, but it’s Nicaraguan filler and as such to my biased opinion, not worthy of being in the same grading system as real Cubans.

So while I can easily give a high 90’s mark to my favorite Cuban the Montecristo #2, I have never given any product from outside Cuban anything higher than a 90.

This cigar deserves to be in the elite class of 90 Ratings we have given to non-Cuban cigars, such as Opus X and Padron, etc.

So that means a Rare 90 Rating is what we honestly give to this fine cigar, and this is the first cigar I ever gave a 90 to, rolled outside of Cuba or the DR.

It’s smooth as silk, but it is not a Cuban, that is THE ONLY NEGATIVE I can say about this GREAT CIGAR.

For cigar smokers to claim there’s nothing special about Cuba or Cuban Cigars, I beg to differ, the reason Cuban Cigars are the greatest cigars in the world, is the fact for hundreds of years the Cuban Soil was used with natural organic pesticides to control insects, so that makes Cuban Cigars SPECIAL. The fact is tobacco plantations existed for hundreds of years in Cuba, and before chemical pesticides were used to control insects, the use of organic pesticides was used and that use is what made the Cuban soil unique today.

It was either real cinnamon or a native plant similar to cinnamon that confused Columbus that was used to chase away insects. Insects hate both Cinnamon and Garlic and they both are natural pesticides.

I would love to see the Serino Company be one of the first US companies to start to have a Cuban company produce a Cuban Serino for them in the near future when the embargo is totally lifted. Then such a fine cigar with the real flavor of what I enjoy, the CUBAN FLAVOR from the CUBAN SOIL will be in such a line and it would easily be like the Montecristo #2 from Cuba a high 90’s rated cigar.

Call me a Cuban snob, but my palate is my palate and nothing but a real CUBAN tastes to me like a REAL CIGAR FROM CUBA.

Serino Cigars, are GREAT CIGARS but they’re still not a Cuban and no cigar grown outside of Cuba can taste like a Cuban Cigar to me, since the secret is THE SOIL.

Get a box of these beauties and put them in the back of your humidor, they will be much sought after in the future, they are that good.

Serino Cigars Review
Serino Cigars Review
Serino Cigars Review
Serino Cigars Review

 

Serino Cigars Review
Serino Cigars Review

There are four blends in the Serino Royale line. The four blends. The list goes from mildest to fullest with the Serino Royale Maduro being positioned as a medium to full offering.

  • Serino Royale Connecticut (Connecticut Shade)
  • Serino Royale Medio (Ecuadorian Habano Claro)
  • Serino Royale Maduro (Ecuadorian Habano Oscuro)
  • Serino Royale Maduro XX (Ecuadorian Habano Oscuro)

Blend Profile

The blend to the Serino Royale Maduro uses a Habano 2000 seed Oscuro wrapper from Ecuador over Nicaraguan binder and filler.

Wrapper: Ecuadorian Habano Oscuro (Habano 2000 seed)
Binder: Nicaraguan
Filler: Nicaraguan
Country of Origin: Nicaragua (La Corona SA)

Vitolas Available

There are four sizes in the Serino Royale Maduro. Each are packaged in 20 count boxes.

Toro: 6 x 52
Robusto Gordo: 5 ½ x 60
Belicoso: 5 1/2 x 60
Petite Sublime: 5 3/4 x 54

i Cigars
Cigar Babes
Cigar Reviews
Cigar News
Cuban Cigars
Cigar Bars
Cigar Stores
Arrow
Arrow
Slider


i Cigars

Cigar Reviews - News - Babes - Deals - Cubans - Ratings


Share
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Follow
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusrssyoutube

Leave a Reply